Resources | Bats

  • The Vincent Wildlife Trust’s Irish bat box schemes report

    This report presents an analysis of The Vincent Wildlife Trust’s Irish bat box project and results of an online survey and was possible due to a grant from the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.


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  • Irish farms and the lesser horseshoe bat

    Practical steps you can take to conserve the lesser horseshoe bat. The lesser horseshoe bat is one of our smallest bats, weighing just 4-9g. It can be identified by a horseshoe-shaped flap of skin around its nose and at rest it hangs upside down, often with its wings wrapped around its body.


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  • Lesser Horseshoe Night Roost Design

    We have recently developed and tested a design for a night roost for lesser horseshoe bats. More information and the design of the night roost is detailed in this document.


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  • Design of the CJM Batbox

    The CJM bat box was designed to imitate niches where crevice dwelling bats might roost; such as a split in a tree trunk or behind loose bark. The three vertical ‘slots’ each of a different width, offers a choice that several species of bat, depending on their size, might use.


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  • Morris, C. Cool Tower for Lesser Horseshoe Bats

    Lesser horseshoe bats, like all bats living in temperate regions, require a range of micro-environments in their summer roosts. The provision of cooler roosting areas for this species is an important consideration when developing mitigation plans or suggesting enhancements for existing roosts.


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  • Fitting a Morris Batslate

    The Morris batslate is a specially designed ‘slate’ that will allow bats access to a roof void. Due to the relatively low cost of materials and labour involved in the construction of a Batslate it is easier to follow these instructions.


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  • Poulton, S. (2006). An analysis of the usage of bat boxes

    This analysis investigates the possibility that batboxes can be used to record the presence of bats in areas where they were previously unknown. The datasets used in this analysis have been derived from the VWT Batbox Database. This holds data from 52 sites collected over 20 years from England, Wales, and Ireland.


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  • Bontadina, F. et al. (2002). Radio-tracking reveals that lesser horseshoe bats forage in woodland

    Over the past 50 years European populations of the lesser horseshoe bat have severely declined. To date, studies of the foraging behaviour of this species have been limited as its low mass (4±8 g) precluded the use of radio-telemetry because commercially available radio-transmitters exceeded 10% of its body mass. In this study, radiotransmitters weighing < 0.35 g were built.


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